Comic Book Review of Silk #1

Silk, by MarvelSilk, by Marvel

Comic Book Review of Silk #1

Marvel has been creating a lot of new superheroes lately, and Silk is one of the most intriguing new additions to the Spider-Man Family of characters.  When first introduced in 2014 as part of the lead-in to the whole Spider-Verse storyline, it seemed like Marvel was retconning Spider-Man's origin needlessly.  However, after seeing Silk (Cindy Moon) in the Spider-Man comics and now in her own title, it seems that Marvel did know what they were doing.  Silk has the potential to be a significant new addition to the ranks of Marvel's heroes.
Silk #1 Cover Marvel

Silk #1 Cover Marvel

First appearing in Amazing Spider-Man vol. 3,  #1 (June, 2014) as her "real" identity as Cindy Moon, and then as the super-powered Silk in Amazing Spider-Man vol. 3,  #4 (September, 2014), her origin turned the original mythology of Peter Parker being bitten by that famously radioactive spider all around.  See, as explained in those Spidey issues, the new version has that poor spider biting Peter, and then, going on to bite Cindy Moon!  Of course, any Spidey fan (from either the comics or the Spider-Man movies) knows what that means. Long story short, Cindy Moon develops Spidey-powers (though with a few variations), but is confined for thirteen years in solitary confinement (see the afore-mentioned early volumes of Amazing Spider-Man vol. 3 for the real details) to basically ward off the what becomes the whole confusing (but entertaining) great Spider-Hunt of the Spider-Verse storyline (yeah, go read that storyline also--you knew I was going to say that, right?)
Silk's First Appearance

Silk's First Appearance

This first issue of Silk's own title does a good job of introducing the reader to the character and her rather unique background.  We see flashbacks from her life before gaining powers, and she is a typical teenager with authority issues with her parents (mom in particular), and a loving relationship with her little brother.  We see them bond over a mutual dislike of white chocolate.  We are also introduced to her current job at the Fact Channel, where one of her bosses is none other than J. Jonah Jameson!  She seems to work there in order to gather information on her missing family.  Like she can't figure out the internet?  And why does this seem like a rip-off of Superman's reasons for working at the Daily Planet?  Hmmm...
Silk, by Stacey Lee

Silk, by Stacey Lee

We see Cindy interacting with her co-workers, one of whom is her roommate. An interesting aspect of the character as we see her navigate in a world that is somewhat alien to her (remember, she was locked up for thirteen years) is how she is out of tune with modern things like Twitter, and her interest in things that are not as popular now as they were then, like Pokémon.  She makes a couple of old-timey references that sort of date her.  Hmmm...sounds a lot like how Captain America acted after he stopped being a frozen "capsicle." Despite the blatantly stolen references to other characters, this is an good first issue.  Silk even gets to meet her first solo villain, a loser named Dragonclaw. As she battles this guy (who, especially in silhouette, looks a lot like old Spider-Man villain the Vulture...Hmmmm...) , we see her try to throw out funny quips like Spider-Man does, though clearly she needs to work on that a bit more.
Silk vs. Dragonclaw in Silk #1

Silk vs. Dragonclaw in Silk #1

And, of course, we have the requisite Spider-Man cameo as he saves her and they both tip-toe around their rather complicated relationship. This was a good first issue for an interesting new character. The story is written by Robbie Thompson (writer from TV’s Supernatural), and he has a good feel for how Spider-Man and Jameson are supposed to act and sound.  His take on Silk/Cindy Moon is good, and his dialogue and the conflicts and relationships he introduces are interesting enough to make the reader return for the next issue.  The  cover art is by Eisner Award winner Dave Johnson and interior pencils are by new artist Stacey Lee.  Lee's rendition of Silk is very good.  Her art is clear, crisp, with just a touch of manga-like styling (especially in the "civilian" images of Cindy Moon and her friends), and her action sequences are logical and look good.   Who should pick up Silk #1 (and the rest of the series)?  Clearly, anyone who liked the Spider-Verse story arc and/or Spidey in general.  We get to see Jonah Jameson explode all over again at another young intern/reporter, and that is always worth the price of admission.  

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