Secret Wars: X-Men ’92 Review-X-Men of the 1990s Animated Show

Jubilee in X-Men '92 Jubilee in X-Men '92

Secret Wars: X-Men '92 Review-X-Men of the 1990s Animated Show

  Secret Wars comes to Marvel's Infinite imprint with the release of the new X-Men '92 digital only comic book. As with the other recent Secret Wars tie-ins in which different time periods or events are given their own domain in the Secret Wars' Battleworld, (See Old Man Logan and X-Men Inferno reviews), here we see the X-Men of the 1992-1997 X-Men Animated Series inhabit their own domain.
Jean Grey and Cyclops in X-Men '92

Jean Grey and Cyclops in X-Men '92

Without going into major spoilers, we can say right now, that this was a fun read! As a fan of the old 1990s cartoon show (hey, let's call it what it is!) this digital comic captures the goofy, innocent, and slightly sanitized ("No civilian casualties, sir!) of that old X-Men television show. If you want to revisit the X-Men Animated Show, check out these reviews of each episode. Yes, Wolverine and Cyclops are still not buddies, Jean Grey is alive and radiant, Rogue sounds southern, Gambit sounds like a fake Frenchman, and, yes, Jubilee is still the cute, yet slightly irritating little sister-type character I remember her being. All is right with the world. But for the "free-range Sentinels," and the too-good-to-be-true appearance of "Baron (Senator) Kelly" to congratulate the X-Men on defeating those pesky Sentinels.
Cyclops and  a Free-Range Sentinel in X-Men '92

Cyclops and a Free-Range Sentinel in X-Men '92

The art by Scott Koblish perfectly captures the feel of the 1990s X-Men show and 1990s comic art in general. This comic looks and feels like the 90s, bad hair and all. We have some dramatic moments between Scott and Professor Xavier, and the requisite surprise ending showing a potential villain. As mentioned above, this digital-only X-Men comic is under Marvel's Infinite imprint. Started in 2012, the Infinite digital format which can: "take advantage of the digital format with techniques that would not be possible in a print comic, like dynamic panel transitions and captions or dialogue boxes that appear sequentially on an image at the prompting of the reader," according to Marvel.   This fairly new interactive format is really fun to use when reading a comic book. If digital comics were ever to actually eclipse the old print version, this is how it would happen. Plus, with this particular comic title, based on an animated show, the whole feel of X-Men '92 #1still retains some of that cartoonish demeanor that fits in so perfectly with these now-classic version of some of our favorite X-Men. I hope Morph shows up in future issues! Who should read this X-Men '92 comic?
  1. Fans of old X-Men Animated Show
  2. Fans of the X-Men
  3. Fans of the old Pink and Purple-colored Sentinels (who designed them, anyway, the Wizard?)
  4. Anyone wanting to check out the Infinite Digital format.
  5. Oh yeah, if are following Secret Wars. HINT: You do not have to be following Secret Wars too closely to really enjoy this X-Men '92 comic. But the whole "Baron Kelly" thing will make more sense if you do.
Rogue and a Sentinel in X-Men '92

Rogue and a Sentinel in X-Men '92

I really liked X-Men '92, and will update this website with more reviews as the issues keep on coming.   Roger Lee, who by night reviews comic books, confesses that when he first fell in love with X-Men: The Animated Show, he was already an adult with a wife, mortgage, and two dogs. His mantra in the 1990s was, "Why couldn't we have cartoons like this when I was a kid?" is matched only by the pathos he now feels wishing that the X-Men and Avengers movies had been available to him as a kid as well.

About the Author

Roger Lee
Roger Lee is a life-long comic book and sci-fi aficionado. As such, he fell into the habit of writing about the superheroes and sci-fi scenarios that he reads in the comics and books and sees on screen. Since writings on superheroes need to be shared, he has written for web audiences for years. His writings have appeared on www.comicshistoryguy.com, www.comicbookmovie.com, www.bamsmackpow.com, and now in superheroreviews.com.